Which consists of himself, “Humo” and “Mibe.” Tekpatl means “perdanal” or “strong as a rock.” They took the name from a novel called Tlacaele written by the great writer Antonio Velasco Pina. The character “Tekpatl” was the best artist within the Aztecs, but was not recognized by other artists due to their fear of what he was capable of creating and was banished.

Tekpatl was later discovered by one of the kings (named Tlacaele) who offers him anything that he wants in return for a unique masterpiece, a sculpture of Tonanzy (Cuatlicue), the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon and stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. The crew identifies themselves with this character because their masterpieces are now accepted in galleries and museums.

Even with museum exposure, Peque’s love for mankind is still expressed through murals in the streets and in rural areas where the average person joins to have fun and socialize. In this way, everyone can experience these works no matter their gender, class or income level. Peque wants working men and women to be able to enjoy his art without having to visit a gallery or museum.

For Peque, graffiti is born in the barrio, and like his brother said, they can take the man out of the barrio, but they can’t take the barrio out of the man. Peque would also like to thank the “old school” taggers. If it weren’t for them, he would not be where he’s at today. If you would like to see more of Peque’s work visit www.photolog.com/peque_vrs or www. myspace.com/peque_vrs.