When Susumu Kaminouchi from Gunma, Japan, first picked up his lowrider, it cost him a hefty sum of $50,000. Now, while it’s not unheard of, nor a surprise to classic car enthusiasts to pay such a number, it’s definitely a sign of the times and proof that now is the time you should buy the car of your dreams. Now keep in mind that Susumo lives in Japan, so there’s definitely a markup, but needless to say it’s a lot of money for a vehicle that originally cost just under $3,000 at the time of its release in 1959.

Ask just about any old timer about the value of cars that have now been deemed “collector cars,” and they’ll tell you depressing stories about a time where they were once a dime a dozen and only worth a few thousand dollars — and plentiful at that. Sure, the same story could be said about many of the classics that roll our way, but that serves as further proof that you should save up for what you want now.

Now what we’re sharing with you is far from rocket science and no award-winning discovery. Rather, it’s just a reminder and simple observation that nothing worth looking at is ever going to be cheaper than it is now. Keep in mind that this doesn’t apply strictly to just a ’59 Impala. As each year passes, and classic cars become harder to find, there’s really no telling where the ceiling stops when it comes to potential pricing.

As for Susumu, his car will most likely end up a keeper since he’s invested plenty of time and hard work into personalizing and maintaining his Impala. From the custom paintjob to the full custom interior and hydraulic setup, Susumu did much of the handywork himself. As the owner of a shop called Ultimate Hydro, and a member of Ultimate Weapons C.C., his car serves as a rolling showcase for his work, while doubling as a passion project that flaunts stellar results. Appropriately enough he calls his car “Green Grass” and we’re pretty sure that there’s more to the name than just the association with the color. Needless to say green grass hits a high note with us over here at LOWRIDER and we’re proud that he’s a part of the movement we’ve all created together.