Mention biscuit tuck or diamond tuft interiors, Truespokes or 520s, and almost instantly it brings back memories of the legendary lowrider scene of the ’70s. While much of that classic styling is no more than a distant memory, it’s an intensely creative style that has become the staple of lowriding, and a memory that will forever be cherished.

But not everyone is eager to leave these staple styling cues for the history books. Today there remains a loyal following of purists who are looking to revive and relive those much-cherished days, and there’s one club in particular celebrating it: Heatwave.

Established with the sole purpose of celebrating that golden era of lowriding, according to club member Ulises Vazquez, “We wanted to go back to the ‘Paper Plate Days,'” a time when guys would take a car right out of the dealership and seemingly overnight have it dropped on a set of Cragars. Taking inspiration from celebrated car clubs, such as Groupe, Klique, and Lifestyle, Gabriel Rubio, president of Heatwave Car Club, has set their standards to follow the style guide set forth by those legendary clubs. “You go from stock to flake and flake to patterns,” Gabriel says, referring to the never-ending evolution of their lowriders. Just like the old days of lowriding, they are swift to remind us that not everyone has to own an Impala or Cadillac. In fact, there was a point in time when the Ford Thunderbird and LTD were the “go-to cars” for any self-respecting lowrider guy.

There are plenty of other American-made cars to choose from and it is reflected in the grand variety of cars they currently have, which include a Mercury Cougar, Camaro, and a Buick Regal. Nearly any year, make, and model is acceptable, so long as it represents that ’70s style. For Heatwave, style is everything, so their members opt to stick with the tried, true, and tested instead of succumbing to the overdone lowriders that are rampant in the scene.

While Heatwave only recently celebrated their inaugural year in existence, they have already become a staple in the lowrider community. And just like that the ’70s flair and infectious ’70s funk songs have seemingly penetrated the market once again, as they are determined to become classics in their own right.