All across “Lowrider Nation,” the word went out: if it’s October, it must be time for the annual Lowrider Magazine Super Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, widely perceived to be the biggest lowrider show in the world. This year’s stellar Tour sponsorship was provided by Quaker State, Nitto Tires, the U.S. Army, CCE Hydraulics, Harley-Davidson and Thump Records. The event was obviously not one to miss, and large crowds poured into the Cashman Field Center to witness hundreds of the most unbelievable cars and trucks on the planet, as well as the hydraulics “showdown” competition, Bikini Contest and maybe the biggest concert in Lowrider Super Show history.

But as always, the big response to the show guaranteed that a few latecomers would be left out in the cold. This was especially a problem this year as the strong buzz building up in the days before the show meant that many who showed up with their lowriders in tow on the day of the show had to be turned away.

Tired of walking the large show, WC takes a break by Anthony's low-low.

“The number of pre-registrations turned in before the show was more than 800 by the deadline,” says Editor Ralph Fuentes. “An untold number of applications were rejected for various reasons after the final date, and we just couldn’t accommodate the hopes of many who were trying to shine in one of only 650 available spots. Even the outdoors area was limited to only a couple of 20×20 displays. But getting your vehicle into the show at the last minute wasn’t the only inconvenienced hype for the day, as spectator tickets were sold out by 3 p.m.” Once you were in, however, the party was on, and the hottest cars (and girls) on the lowrider scene were all in one place.

Three words sum up the show scene for the top dogs these days… attention to detail. Now more than ever, many of the top car owners are taking great pains and time to make sure that their vehicles are detailed to the max. A car like Anthony Fuentes’ ’63 Chevy Impala, “Sun Dance,” with every wire under the dash being yellow, and literally every part of the car being touched by paint, chrome or polishing, is a prime example of this trend.

Much love to Sonia and Tim from Quaker State for their continued support. All they had left after the show was a banner.

Three words sum up the show scene for the top dogs these days… attention to detail. Now more than ever, many of the top car owners are taking great pains and time to make sure that their vehicles are detailed to the max. A car like Anthony Fuentes’ ’63 Chevy Impala, “Sun Dance,” with every wire under the dash being yellow, and literally every part of the car being touched by paint, chrome or polishing, is a prime example of this trend.

This month’s ’64 Impala cover car, Bowtie Connection’s “Certified Gangster,” was, as you may have read in the “Madness Before The Show” sidebar, in pieces just days before the show with some of the final details completed just prior to the show. Bowtie Connection’s Freddy Pena and owner “Large” must work well under pressure, though, because the car earned the Super Show’s Lowrider Excellence Award.

The hydraulics setups have become more elaborate, too, as evidenced by Faustino Flores’ December ’04 LRM cover car, “Three-Karat Diamond.” At the time of that photo shoot, the ’58 Impala convertible had an air-ride system, but shortly thereafter had its undercarriage totally redone with a hydro setup installed featuring aircraft pumps and plenty of chrome, gold and engraving. Faustino and Nancy drove away from Vegas with the Best Traditional Lowrider trophy.

Edging out Anthony’s ’63 and Bowtie Connection’s ’64 in the Best Car class was Alejandro Vega’s ’79 Chevy Monte Carlo, “Orgullo Mexicano.” Congratulations, Alejandro, on your mighty Monte’s return to Lowrider Car of the Year status. Be sure to check the winner’s list for a complete rundown of the top dogs at the Super Show.

The Super Show was truly a “super” show in ’05 with not only top-notch cars, but top-notch entertainment, too. Lil’ Rob, Cypress Hill’s B-Real, Baby Bash and Ice Cube romped through their hits (see the accompanying sidebar report on the concert). There was certainly a party atmosphere around the stage and the 16,000-plus in attendance appreciated the show. In fact, the whole afternoon harkened back to the days of the Super Show at the L.A. Coliseum, when, after a day spent checking out a collection of the most unbelievable vehicles anywhere, the top headliners got up on stage and ripped it up for the huge crowds. That’s a trend that we’d like to see continue at future Super Shows. We’ll see you with a new bag of tricks in ’06.